Torazakana’s Food Lifestyle

I am a person who eats to live, and not one who lives to eat. Anyone who knows me well enough can tell you that I sometimes grumble about why humans require food to survive.

It has been more than 10 months since I arrived here and started living by myself. When I first came here, my lunch was food from my work canteen, and my dinner was something off the ready-made bento rack from the nearby supermarket most of the time. I gradually grew sick of my dinner bentos after a couple of months and decided to → Read more

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Falling Sick

My throat started hurting, and then it turned into a cold – with chills, headache, slight pain in joints and a hint of a fever. I couldn’t think straight and felt cold even though the temperature was at 29 degrees. Had to use two hours of 代休 (off in lieu) and leave work at 15:00 to crash into bed – but not before texting BF to help buy me some sandwiches for dinner. At about 17:30, BF came over with not only sandwiches but soba and salad – as well as a hamburg bento set for himself. He also got me this Oral Rehydration Solution that is supposed to taste good when you’re sick but awful when you’re well. It tasted good. Damn.

We watched a couple of → Read more

The Habit of Tracking Expenses

I have been tracking my expenses quite successfully for about a year in my home country before coming to Japan. I would diligently key in whatever I have purchased straight after I bought them, or kept receipts to enter them in later. I did all these because I read that a person who is in control of their financial situation has a much better control of their life overall. However, after coming to Japan, I stopped doing this. Reason being I did not → Read more

How to sort and handle trash to prevent bugs in Japan

A big hello to those who are about to step into Japan, the country that has a reputation for crazy trash sorting!

I am here to tell you that you will most likely receive a huge poster or a guidebook in English that explains how to sort the trash, so not to worry! It is different from prefecture to prefecture, and even for places within the prefecture, so it is best to refer to your own guide. Some places are strict, others less so.

Most items can be sorted into burnable and non-burnable waste. They will only be collected on certain days of the week. Food waste, which can be classified under burnable, rot faster in the summer. I suggest that you → Read more

Cycling in Japan

Having never needed to ride the bicycle in my home country, I only just started learning how to ride it before I came to Japan. Thus, I experience OH MY GOSH THAT WAS FREAKING CLOSE situations when I’m on my bicycle at least three times a month if not more.

Let me share with you what happened today.
I have to post my 年賀状s (new year greeting cards) by the 25th, so I figured that I should get them posted now in case I forget tomorrow. Unfortunately, today was a rainy day. I looked out my window – hoping that it would lighten up enough so that I can cycle to the post office relatively near my place. It did, so I went out.

However, it started to rain quite a bit on the way back, and I had two close shaves. A car didn’t notice me as he turned at the traffic light spot (it was still green for pedestrians), and I had to shift my course of direction towards the left before he realised I was there. Another incident happened when I → Read more

How to write a Nengajo (年賀状)

When writing 年賀状 (nengajo – new year cards),

1) Commas and periods are not used. Try to use sentences that do not require them. If it is not possible, either leave a space or start a new line, to indicate breaks in the message.

2) Avoid inauspicious words. For example, when saying “last year”, instead of using 去年, use 昨年 or 旧年. Words like 去る, 離れる, 切れる, 落ちる, 終わる, 離れる should also be avoided.

3) Ballpoint pens are also frowned upon.
Here is a list of writing tools lined up from the most recommended, to the least recommended. Writing Brush → Calligraphy Pen → Oil-based Felt Pen → Ballpoint Pen
→ Read more